Third annual Ethnic Heritage Council potluck picnic on Sunday, August 13

The International Examiner August 10, 2017 0

The Potluck Picnic will be held at United Indians of All Tribes’ Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center.
Photo from United Indians of All Tribes

On Sunday, August 13, the Ethnic Heritage Council will host its third annual Potluck Picnic from 2 PM to 5 PM at the Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center (5011 Bernie Whitebear Way in Seattle’s Discovery Park). Attendees are asked to RSVP by August 11 by sending their name(s) to rsvp@ethnicheritagecouncil.org, and to bring an ethnic or favorite dish to the potluck to share.

Attendees will have the opportunity to share about the tradition behind the dish they brought and may also win a prize for their dish. The Ethnic Heritage Council will have prizes for the Most Interesting Ingredients, Most Flavorful, and Most Colorful dishes.

The potluck will also have games and performances by Emiko Noor Nakamura of Seattle-Tashkent Sister City Association and Mystic Rose Art Group, and Chantaly Nuon and Andrew Teamkitti and visiting artist Thanapan Korsinklang with music by Seattle’s Chaopraya Ensemble. Additionally, there will be sales tables featuring Filipino botanicals and visual art, Mimi Globe Goods Refugee Artisans, the Northwest African American Museum, Pacific Ohana Foundation, Southwest Indian jewelry, Greater Kent Historical Society, and Seattle Preschool Program.

The Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center is the home of United Indians of All Tribes. The building is an impressive example of modern architecture incorporating traditional cedar and many elements of the Northwest Native design. You’re invited to view the Native artwork on the second floor, including the display honoring Bernie Whitebear and the Filipino community in the Bernie Whitebear Room. Enjoy the many trails, take a walk to the reflecting pond, camp ground, and the sweat lodge while enjoying the amazing views of both Shilshole Bay and Elliott Bay.

Opening in 1977 after seven years of struggle and development, the Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center owes its existence to Native American activists. In 1970 led by Bernie Whitebear, the Indian community and supporters staged a non-violent occupation of a portion of the land “by right of discovery” for the use of Indian people, after most of the Fort Lawton military base was declared surplus by the U.S. Department of Defense.  

Daybreak Star serves as an event venue and  conference center. It’s popular for powwows, weddings and meetings. The center houses a multi-ethnic pre-school, Native Workforce staff, Ina Maka Family Services, Foster Care program, and the Sacred Circle Art Gallery. The center is the nucleus of Native American cultural activity in this region. For more information visit:  Daybreak Star Center

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